Mildred McMillen (1884-1940) was part of the original group of Provincetown Printers. Known for her bold woodcuts, McMillen’s prints stand alone as they are large-scale and black and white as opposed to the other Provincetown Printers’ work, which were in color. Her sophisticated compositions emphasize the geometric rhythms of the house and yards and laborers of Provincetown. Born in Chicago, Illinois in 1884, McMillen studied art at the school of the Art Institute of Chicago. There she met fellow artist Ada Gilmore and later Read more…
Mildred McMillen (1884-1940) was part of the original group of Provincetown Printers. Known for her bold woodcuts, McMillen’s prints stand alone as they are large-scale and black and white as opposed to the other Provincetown Printers’ work, which were in color. Her sophisticated compositions emphasize the geometric rhythms of the house and yards and laborers of Provincetown. Born in Chicago, Illinois in 1884, McMillen studied art at the school of the Art Institute of Chicago. There she met fellow artist Ada Gilmore and later moved to Paris and then Provincetown with Gilmore in 1914. Other Provincetown Printers known for their white line wood cuts include Ethel Mars, Blanche Lazzell, B.J.O. Nordfeldt, Ada Gilmore and Maud Hunt Squire. Mary Ryan Gallery has included McMillen woodcuts in group exhibitions at the gallery, most recently in 2008. Her woodcuts were included in the exhibition and accompanying catalog, “From Paris to Provincetown: Blanche Lazzell and the Color Woodcut” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, curated by Barbara Stern Shapiro. The exhibition traveled to the Cleveland Museum of Art. [ – ] MINIMIZE